Again it is the Le Figaro which is at the initiative of the mediatisation of the proposed destruction of ; the Calais slum, unveiling the government’s plans for “relocating” people.

So, the Prefects must open 12 000 places almost all over France by the end of the year, in a concentrated manner (between 100 and 300 place structures), called “Welcome Centers and Guidance centres ” (CAO – see here, here, here and here). We note in passing that the state has finally aligned itself with the association’s figures and is anticipating an increase in the number of people present in Calais by the time of the eviction.

At one end of the chain, we know, that almost a year after the coming into operation of the scheme that the CAO only work if there is some involvement of local people to compensate for the state’s shortcomings both in terms of the quality of the reception and accompaniment. Overall, the scheme has a 45% failure rate, that is to say people who leave the centres because what they are proposing isn’t what they are looking for.

At the other end of the chain, there will be no voluntary departures of people agreeing to move away from Calais to reflect on their migratory projects, but rather as a consequence of mass arrests amid the destruction of the camp. This suggests that the rate of departures, as was the case in previous evictions in the first hours and the first days will be even greater.

So beyond this trick of the eye “relocation”, the question remains, what will happen in Calais once the slum has been destroyed and many of those evicted come back, and to the new people will continue to arrive ?

What will this eviction achieve any more than those conducted under the direction of Eric Besson then immigration minister in September and October 2009 ?

Except to show that the authorities have the technical capacity to conduct evictions and the destruction of homes and forced displacement on the scale of several thousand people, which is not necessarily the most glorious in the history of glorious headlines.

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